More Americans Are Making No Weekly Purchases With Cash

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Americans are becoming less reliant on physical currency. Roughly three-in-ten U.S. adults (29 percent) say they make no purchases using cash during a typical week, up slightly from 24 percent in 2015. And the share who say that all or almost all of their weekly purchases are made using cash has modestly decreased, from 24 percent in 2015 to 18 percent today, according to a new Pew Research Center survey that comes as some businesses experiment with becoming cashless establishments.

Demographic patterns in the new survey, which was conducted in September and October, are similar to those in a 2015 survey by the Center. Most notably, adults with an annual household income of $75,000 or more are more than twice as likely as those earning less than $30,000 a year to say they do not make any purchases using cash in a typical week (41 percent vs. 18 percent).

Conversely, lower-income Americans are about four times as likely as higher-income Americans to say they make all or almost all of their purchases using cash (29 percent vs. 7 percent). Click here to read the full story from Pew Research.