Going Mobile

By Staff
Friday, January 17, 2020 3:54 PM Mobile is more powerful than ever— in fact, according to Inc. and the State of Mobile report from App Annie, consumer and ad spend on mobile devices is expected to be $350 billion in 2020. As we spend more and more time (and money) on our phones each day, it's valuable to learn how customers are actually using their phones and spending that time and money. Head over to Inc. to learn more.

#GlaucomaAwarenessMonth Information for All

By Staff
Thursday, January 16, 2020 12:20 PM January is Glaucoma Awareness Month. This month, in addition to the Prevent Blindness fact sheet available online, Canadian Association of Optometrists has released free downloadable fact sheets in Cree, Ojibwe, Inuktitut, making information about Glaucoma available to even more people. Take a look at the CAO's website to learn more.

The Toll Diet Can Take on Vision

By Staff
Wednesday, January 15, 2020 1:45 PMstudy published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology in December posits the hypothesis that eating a "Western pattern diet," which uncludes proccessed meat, fried foods and high sugar, may present risks for developing AMD. Head over to Runner's World to read more about this study and why it's so important, or read the full study online here.

Tinted Lenses Trend at the Golden Globes

By Staff
Tuesday, January 14, 2020 11:36 AM Award show fashion is almost always a hot button topic. Dresses, suits and accessories often face extreme scrutinty the morning after, dividing opinions and even, sometimes, grabbing a spot on the morning news. But at this year's Golden Globes, it seems like there was one trend everyone agreed on: tinted lenses. Earlier this week, The Cut took a look at how tinted lenses became all the rage at the Golden Globes 2020, and who wore them best.

Magno Enters Formal Training

By Staff
Monday, January 13, 2020 2:18 PM Magno, the German Shepherd guide dog that Eschenbach has been helping to raise in partnership with the Fidelco Guide Dog Foundation, has officially entered formal guide dog training in Bloomfield, Conn. At the end of this process, Magno will graduate to full guide dog work, and will be matched with a visually impaired person who needs him. You can follow Magno's process on Eschenbach's social media pages

4-Year-Old May Lose Vision After Battling Flu

By Staff
Friday, January 10, 2020 2:49 PM Jade DeLucia, 4, of Iowa may be going home today after a bout of the flu landed her in the intensive care unit fighting for her life and her eyesight. Jade was flown to the University of Iowa Stead Family Children's Hospital and diagnosed with the flu on Dec. 24, according to a spokesperson for the Iowa City hospital. The girl's grandmother, Courtney Frey, told a local television station that the infection made the girl's brain swell. On the family Facebook page to help support Jade's fight, there was mention of eyesight problems. "We’re doing one final test here soon to see if her brain will react to her eyes," her mother, Amanda Phillips wrote. "If her brain does respond then there is hope for her eyesight returning. If it doesn’t then we'll be taking home the bravest, strongest, kindest, blind girl I will ever meet." Go to WebMD for the full story. 

3 Times When It’s Better to Work Alone

By Staff
Thursday, January 9, 2020 4:37 PM Almost every complex achievement involves teams of people. But just because cooperative effort is crucial in many situations, and working with others can help you stay accountable, it doesn’t mean that you should always default to group work. Perhaps the most important time that you want to do a lot of work alone is when you have the task of finding a creative solution to a problem. There is a tendency in these situations to gather groups together to engage in brainstorming, but the evidence is overwhelming that letting people throw ideas out to each other actually reduces the overall creativity of the group. For more situations in which working solo is the way to go, click here for the full story from Fast Company

Macy's Holiday Season Sales Fall Less Than Feared

By Staff
Wednesday, January 8, 2020 2:30 AM Macy’s Inc reported a small decline in holiday same-store sales on Wednesday, surprising investors who were bracing for a sharper drop following an earlier profit warning, according to a story from Reuters. The company, which cut its annual profit forecast in November blaming weak international tourism and sluggish mall traffic, reported a 0.6 percent decline in holiday sales during November and December. Macy’s is among the first major corporate names to report sales for the holiday season, which is seen as a barometer for the health of U.S. consumer spending. The retailer also plans to shutter 28 Macy’s locations and one Bloomingdale’s store in the coming weeks, a Macy’s spokeswoman said. Click here to read the full story from Reuters.

After Studying the Lives of 724 Men for 79 Years, Harvard Reveals the 1 Biggest Secret to Success and Happiness

By Staff
Tuesday, January 7, 2020 11:00 AM Have you ever wondered what it takes to live the good life? Have you ever wondered what the secret to success and happiness is? Harvard researchers seem to have an answer in a 79-year-old study. After poring through a mountain-load of data, obtained from in-person interviews, questionnaires, medical records, etc., researchers concluded that close relationships are what make men happy, and that social ties shield people from life challenges while improving mental and physical health. This is surprising in a culture that recognizes hard work as the ticket to the good life. In a rare kind of ongoing research, the Harvard Study of Adult Development has managed to track the lives of 724 men for 79 years. Click here to read the full story from Inc. Magazine.

Looking Into the Eyes for Early Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease

By Staff
Monday, January 6, 2020 11:30 AM KINGSTON, R.I.—Imagine if you could find out, decades ahead of time, whether you are going to suffer from Alzheimer’s disease. Now imagine if you could detect those signs through an eye scan—rather than through the invasive, expensive tests that doctors now use. That is the potential of a clinical trial involving the University of Rhode Island, Butler Hospital’s Clinical and Aging Program, and Florida’s BayCare Health System. According to a recent story from the Boston Globe, on Monday the three organizations announced the launch of a five-year, $5 million clinical trial of a retinal screening process that could help detect Alzheimer’s more than two decades before symptoms appear. The study is seeking 300 volunteers between the ages of 55 and 80. Click here to read the full story.

What Is Gen Z Looking for at Work?

By Staff
Friday, January 3, 2020 1:11 PM 2020 is here. The dawn of a new decade brings many thing to the table—including a new work force. As Generation Z enters the workplace, many hiring managers are working to figure out how to best appeal to them. Head over to Inc. for a more in-depth look at what Gen Z wants in a workplace—you never know how adapting might change your business for the better.

A Look at How Far Trachoma Treatment Has Come

By Staff
Thursday, January 2, 2020 12:53 PM In many cases, Trachoma is a treatable condition that doesn't have to lead to blindness. But that hasn't always been the case. Sightsavers is working to end Trachoma around the world—and taking a look at some of the ways Trachoma has been treated throughout history, from bloodletting in Victorian England to using fish bile in the 17th century Middle East. Head over to Twitter to learn more about some retired treatments for Trachoma, and how to help put an end to the disease around the world today.

Managing Stress After The Holidays

By Staff
Monday, December 30, 2019 12:08 PM With the holidays behind us and the new year rolling out ahead of us, there's probably a lot on most minds right now. On top of settling into a new decade and settling down from two weeks of chaos, many people are headed back to work over the next couple of days. Together, all these things might feel pretty stressful and overwhelming—especially after taking time off. To help get settled into the new year, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has put together some stress management tips. Take a look at the tips and start 2020 as you mean to go on: relaxed.

New Discoveries In Fuchs Dystrophy Research

By Staff
Friday, December 27, 2019 12:18 PM The Massachusetts Eye and Ear has announced new developments in their research on Fuchs Dystrophy. According to the institution, "A new study on the eye disease Fuchs dystrophy reveals for the first time that exposure to UVA light may play a major role in the disease." Head over to the Massachusetts Eye and Ear blog to learn more about this new development.

Man Allegedly Murders Wife With Eye Drops

By Staff
Thursday, December 26, 2019 9:32 AM A North Carolina man is accused of using eye drops to murder his wife. According to The Washington Post, investigators believe that Joshua Lee Hunsucker could be "responsible for poisoning and killing his wife with a chemical decongestant, tetrahydrozoline, that is common in brand names like Visine." Head over to The Washington Post to read the full story.