Coronavirus BRIEFING
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COVID Influence Is Reflected in Mortality and Birth Rates Across U.S.

By Staff
Friday, February 23, 2024 3:02 PM Birth rates are on the rise in the U.S. after mortality rates fell for the first time since before the pandemic. A new report from the U.S. Census Bureau finds that more than half of the U.S. is seeing births outpace deaths. New data shows that across most of the U.S., a natural rebound in birth rates was experienced by July 2023, however, 19 states still saw a decrease, with areas of the South and Northeast seeing more deaths than births. 

Birth rates fell steadily beginning in 2020. This was particularly evident in communities with older populations and areas experiencing low migration. In 2020, the natural birth rate increase was around 1 million people per year. 

Areas like Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and West Virginia were among the states to see the highest number of deaths versus births. This shifted between 2020 and 2020 when half of all states saw a natural decrease. In 2020, the natural increase fell by 27 percent, mostly due to a rise in deaths resulting from COVID-19 and a fall in births by 1.4 percent. 

As the pandemic continued through 2021, a natural decrease switched to a natural increase in deaths in New York by 28,326. Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts and New Jersey saw similar patterns.

According to Johns Hopkins University and Medicine, globally the U.S. saw the highest number of COVID-19-related deaths at 1,123,836, followed by Brazil at 699,276, and India at 530,779.

The World Health Organization noted that the true numbers may never be known as the percentage of registered deaths ranged from 98 percent in the European region to only 10 percent in the African region.

U.S. Nurse Workforce Bounces Back After Pandemic Shortage Fears

By Staff
Wednesday, February 21, 2024 8:02 AM Despite fears that the COVID-19 pandemic would devastate the American registered nurse (RN) workforce for years to come, a new study found that nurse employment has actually grown in the past 2 years, according to a new study.

Do We Simply Not Care About Old People?

By Staff
Wednesday, February 21, 2024 6:12 AM The COVID-19 pandemic would be a wake-up call for America, advocates for the elderly predicted: incontrovertible proof that the nation wasn't doing enough to care for vulnerable older adults.

The National Average for Gross Revenue at ECP Locations Decreased for the Week of Feb. 12–18, Jobson’s Latest Practice Performance Tracker Shows

By Staff
Wednesday, February 21, 2024 12:27 AM NEW YORK—The national average for gross revenue at ECP locations decreased last week, Feb. 12–18, when compared with the previous week at a rate of -1 index point. That places gross revenue at a level -1 index point below where it was at this point in time (Week 7) when compared with last year (2023), 6 points above the same period in 2022, 11 points above 2021, 14 points above 2020, and 22 points above 2019, according to Jobson’s most recent Practice Performance Tracker.

CDC May Recommend Spring COVID Booster for At-Risk Groups

By Staff
Tuesday, February 20, 2024 7:59 AM A CDC advisory committee will meet this month to decide whether to recommend a spring COVID booster for vulnerable groups such as the elderly and people with weakened immune systems.

It's Risky to Mix Paxlovid With Immunosuppressants

By Staff
Friday, February 16, 2024 8:02 AM Medicines Agency (EMA) has issued a reminder to healthcare professionals regarding the potential serious adverse reactions associated with Paxlovid when administered in combination with specific immunosuppressants.

COVID's Latest Adaptation: It Has Lulled us to Sleep

By Staff
Friday, February 16, 2024 6:09 AM I'm an 83-year-old retired physician. I let my medical license expire over a decade ago and have put my medical care into the hands of very capable people paid for by Medicare—just like most people my age. Generally, I have been happy with this arrangement and enjoy good health.

The National Average for Gross Revenue at ECP Locations Decreased for the Week of Feb. 5–11, Jobson’s Latest Practice Performance Tracker Shows

By Staff
Friday, February 16, 2024 12:30 AM NEW YORK—The national average for gross revenue at ECP locations decreased last week, Feb. 5–11, when compared with the previous week at a rate of -3 index points. That places gross revenue at a level 4 index points above where it was at this point in time (Week 6) when compared with last year (2023), 16 points above the same period in 2022, 10 points above 2021, 12 points above 2020 and 20 points above 2019, according to Jobson’s most recent Practice Performance Tracker.

Should the CDC Cut the 5-Day COVID-19 Isolation Guidelines? Experts Weigh in

By Staff
Wednesday, February 14, 2024 4:52 PM The CDC is reportedly considering a big change in isolation guidelines for people with COVID. Dr. @CelineGounder shares why the agency may be weighing such a change—and how to protect others if you test positive. Click here to watch the CBS Mornings news segment.

Soaring Rates of Healthcare Use After COVID

By Staff
Wednesday, February 14, 2024 8:02 AM Welcome to Impact Factor, your weekly dose of commentary on a new medical study. I'm Dr F. Perry Wilson of the Yale School of Medicine. By February 2024, 1.2 million people in the United States had died of COVID — a loss of life that exceeds what we saw in World War II, the so-called "Spanish" flu of 1918, the Civil War, and the entire AIDS epidemic.
But this story is not about the people who died.

Virus and Booster Apathy Could Be Fueling Long COVID

By Staff
Wednesday, February 14, 2024 8:02 AM Maria Maio wasn't the only person in her workplace battling COVID-19 in early December 2023. But while everyone else she knows got better, she got long COVID.

CDC May Be Changing COVID Isolation Recommendations

By Staff
Tuesday, February 13, 2024 6:09 AM The Washington Post is reporting that new CDC guidance will recommend that Americans testing positive for COVID-19 no longer need to isolate for 5 days.

Mild COVID-19 Can Cause Sleep Problems, Study Finds

By Staff
Monday, February 12, 2024 7:59 AM Even a mild case of COVID-19 can cause people to have trouble sleeping, according to new research.

Oakley and the NFL Gear Up for Super Bowl LVIII

By Staff
Friday, February 9, 2024 8:05 AM LAS VEGAS—Ahead of Super Bowl LVIII, Oakley, the NFL’s official on-field partner through 2030, has an updated on-field presence with a refreshed logo on the pro-shields, offering increased visibility and showcasing the brand’s ability to deliver eyewear solutions that redefine how athletes compete. Since Oakley and the NFL’s partnership began, all NFL athletes—including those playing in this weekend’s Super Bowl—have had the opportunity to wear Prizm Clear Shields equipped with Prizm Lens technology, which allow them to see more detail and contrast in game.

New Evidence Suggests Long COVID Could Be a Brain Injury

By Staff
Friday, February 9, 2024 8:02 AM Brain fog is one of the most common, persistent complaints in patients with long COVID. It affects as many as 46% of patients who also deal with other cognitive concerns like memory loss and difficulty concentrating.